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PFAS 101

March 11, 2020

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PFAS 101

March 11, 2020

Authored by: John Kindschuh and Tom Lee

In a world filled with acronyms, PFAS has started emerging as a topic of conversation, regulation, and litigation.  Enforcement actions and lawsuits have so far mostly focused on the companies that have manufactured two of the most widely used, and the most heavily regulated, PFAS compounds – PFOA and PFOS – but the scope of regulation and litigation is expanding further into this large family of compounds.

What are PFAS Chemicals?

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (“PFAS”) are a family of over 5,000 man-made fluorinated chemicals some of which have been used since the 1940’s across a variety of industries as part of manufacturing processes, and as components of consumer products.

PFAS are defined by having elemental bonds of fluorine and carbon, rendering them pervasive and persistent.  Significantly, this means that PFAS compounds do not break down easily either in the environment or in living organisms.

PFAS chemicals can repel both

No Binding Federal Drinking Water Regulations for 1,4-Dioxane

People want certainty from federal agencies.  We all yearn for direction, especially from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”).  Here is the information, albeit limited, we can use for 1,4-Dioxane.

What is 1,4-Dioxane?

1,4-Dioxane is a synthetic industrial chemical that is a colorless, clear, and flammable liquid with a faint odor.[1]

1,4-Dioxane was used as a solvent for extracting animal and vegetable oils as well as in the formulation of inks, coatings, and adhesives.  It also was also used as a solvent in processing crude petroleum, petroleum refining, and petrochemicals.[2]

1,4-Dioxane was (and sometimes currently still is) found in numerous goods, including deodorants, perfumes, mouthwashes, paints, cosmetics, detergents, certain plastics, and other products.[3]

What are the Drinking Water Requirements?

Notably, there is no maximum contaminant level (“MCL”) for 1,4-Dioxane.  To date, EPA has only issued a health advisory suggestion that others

1,4-Dioxane Background

1,4-Dioxane Background

March 5, 2020

Authored by: Susan Brice and John Kindschuh

1,4-Dioxane is considered an emerging contaminant.  This post provides some insight regarding the substance, underscoring its potential importance to you and your company.

What is 1,4-Dioxane?

1,4-Dioxane is a synthetic industrial chemical that is both a flammable liquid and is potentially explosive, especially at elevated temperatures.[1]  It is colorless, clear liquid and it has a faint, but pleasant, odor.

1,4-Dioxane was used as a solvent for extracting animal and vegetable oils as well as in the formulation of inks, coatings, and adhesives.[2]  Additionally, 1,4-Dioxane was used as a stabilizer or corrosion inhibitor for chlorinated solvents, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane (“TCA”).[3]  Although 1,1,1 TCA has not been used since 1995, the historical contamination caused by this substance is currently sparking the attention of regulators.[4]

1,4-Dioxane was also used as a solvent in processing crude petroleum, petroleum refining, and petrochemicals.

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