BCLP Emerging Contaminants Emerging Solutions

Emerging Contaminants Emerging Solutions

1,4-Dioxane

Main Content

No Binding Federal Drinking Water Regulations for 1,4-Dioxane

People want certainty from federal agencies.  We all yearn for direction, especially from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”).  Here is the information, albeit limited, we can use for 1,4-Dioxane.

What is 1,4-Dioxane?

1,4-Dioxane is a synthetic industrial chemical that is a colorless, clear, and flammable liquid with a faint odor.[1]

1,4-Dioxane was used as a solvent for extracting animal and vegetable oils as well as in the formulation of inks, coatings, and adhesives.  It also was also used as a solvent in processing crude petroleum, petroleum refining, and petrochemicals.[2]

1,4-Dioxane was (and sometimes currently still is) found in numerous goods, including deodorants, perfumes, mouthwashes, paints, cosmetics, detergents, certain plastics, and other products.[3]

What are the Drinking Water Requirements?

Notably, there is no maximum contaminant level (“MCL”) for 1,4-Dioxane.  To date, EPA has only issued a health advisory suggestion that others

1,4-Dioxane Background

1,4-Dioxane Background

March 5, 2020

Authored by: Susan Brice and John Kindschuh

1,4-Dioxane is considered an emerging contaminant.  This post provides some insight regarding the substance, underscoring its potential importance to you and your company.

What is 1,4-Dioxane?

1,4-Dioxane is a synthetic industrial chemical that is both a flammable liquid and is potentially explosive, especially at elevated temperatures.[1]  It is colorless, clear liquid and it has a faint, but pleasant, odor.

1,4-Dioxane was used as a solvent for extracting animal and vegetable oils as well as in the formulation of inks, coatings, and adhesives.[2]  Additionally, 1,4-Dioxane was used as a stabilizer or corrosion inhibitor for chlorinated solvents, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane (“TCA”).[3]  Although 1,1,1 TCA has not been used since 1995, the historical contamination caused by this substance is currently sparking the attention of regulators.[4]

1,4-Dioxane was also used as a solvent in processing crude petroleum, petroleum refining, and petrochemicals.

The attorneys of Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner make this site available to you only for the educational purposes of imparting general information and a general understanding of the law. This site does not offer specific legal advice. Your use of this site does not create an attorney-client relationship between you and Bryan Cave LLP or any of its attorneys. Do not use this site as a substitute for specific legal advice from a licensed attorney. Much of the information on this site is based upon preliminary discussions in the absence of definitive advice or policy statements and therefore may change as soon as more definitive advice is available. Please review our full disclaimer.